Today in Labor History: April 16; Member Tip

Today in Labor History: April 16
Five hundred workers in Texas City, Texas die in a series of huge oil refinery and chemical plant explosions and fires – 19472014.04.14—history-prepared-bookcover
(Are You Prepared? A Guide to Emergency Planning in the Workplace: Today’s headlines are filled with disaster, from the natural—fire, flood, hurricane, tornado and the like—to the man-made, such as workplace shootings, explosions, accidental releases of toxic chemicals or radiation, even nightmares such as bombings. Are you and your co-workers prepared to respond quickly and safely if disaster strikes? Steps you take today can save lives tomorrow, from having escape plans to knowing how to quickly turn off power and fuel supplies.)
—Click here for the complete posting.

Member Tip: Your Union Contract
Society functions under a set of laws passed by legislators.  The workplace functions under a collective bargaining agreement 2014.04.14—membertip-contractnegotiated by the union and the employer.  Both serve the same purpose: creating a set of binding rules on what is permitted and what is prohibited.  How does a contract get negotiated?  Sometimes the law under which a particular union and employer operate sets out specific procedures for reaching a collective bargaining agreement.  Or in the union contract itself, your union and employer may have agreed upon a set of rules for how the next contract is to be negotiated.  Exactly how the bargaining process shapes up will be determined in large part by whether you are in the public or private sector, and by the ground rules or history of the parties in your industry or workplace.
—Adapted from The Union Member’s Complete Guide, by Michael Mauer

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