Today in Labor History: Weekend Edition; Labor Video

Today in Labor History: Weekend Edition
September 18—One week after the September 11, 2001, attacks, anthrax spores are mailed by an unknown party to several news media offices and two U.S. senators. Five people exposed to the spores died, including two workers at Washington, D.C.’s USPS Brentwood facility: Thomas Morris, Jr. and Joseph Curseen, who were to die of their exposure within the month – 2001
September 19—Musician and labor educator Joe Glazer, often referred to as “Labor’s Troubadour,” died today at age 88.  Some of his more acclaimed songs include “The Mill Was Made of Marble,” “Too Old To Work” and “Automaton.” In 1979 he and labor folklorist Archie Green convened a meeting of 14 other
labor musicians to begin what was to become the annual Great Labor Arts Exchange and,
soon thereafter, the Labor Heritage Foundation – 2006
September 20—According to folklorist John Garst, steel-drivin’ man John Henry, born a slave, outperformed a steam hammer on this date at the Coosa Mountain Tunnel or the Oak Mountain Tunnel of the Columbus and Western Railway (now part of the Norfolk Southern) near Leeds, Ala. Other researchers place the contest near Talcott, W. Va. – 1887

Labor Video: Which Side Are You On? 
The Dropkick Murphys version of the classic union anthem, Which Side Are You On, set to a backdrop of labor images. Click here to watch the video.